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May252019

Big Changes Coming to Retirement Plans

There are multiple bills before Congress now that are intended to help IRA owners and  participants invested  in workplace retirement plans such as 401(k)s. The proposals have some overlapping provisions, along with a number of important differences.

The House of Representatives passed a retirement bill (known as the SECURE Act) on Thursday which includes an assortment of changes for participants in 401(k) plans and owners of IRA's. The Senate may be poised to pass the bill, or a similar one, quickly and send it to the president, who is expected to sign it. Here’s a look ahead:

Convert your IRA Into an Annuity

It’ll become easier to convert your retirement savings into a steady lifetime income—a feature common to old-fashioned pensions—by buying an annuity in a 401(k)-style retirement plan. Currently, only 9% of employers offer this option, according to Vanguard Group Inc.  Employers would be able to choose whether to offer an annuity and, if so, which type to offer.

Keep Contributing after Age 70½

The bill repeals the age cap for contributing to a traditional IRA, currently 70½, making it easier for people with taxable compensation to continue saving if they continue to work.

Defer Required Minimum Distributions Until Age 72

Under current rules, you must start taking minimum (taxable) withdrawals from your IRA or 401(k) when you turn age 70½. Under the new bill, the age to start taking required taxable withdrawals from 401(k)s and IRAs would increase to 72.

See How much Income Your 401(k) Supports

The legislation would also make it easier for employees to understand how much monthly income their 401(k) balance supports by requiring employers to disclose an estimate on 401(k) statements. So participants would see not only their account balance on their statements, but also a lifetime stream of monthly payments based on expected-mortality tables.

Part-time Employees Can now Participate in 401(k)s

The bill requires 401(k)-style retirement plans to allow long-tenured part-time employees working more than 500 hours a year (employed for at least three years) to participate.

Penalty-free Withdrawals for Expenses of Adoptions or Child-birth

The bill would allow you to take penalty-free distributions from 401(k)s and IRAs of up to $5,000 within a year of the birth or adoption of a child to cover associated expenses (normally, a 10% penalty tax applies for pre-age-59½ withdrawals). You will still owe taxes on the withdrawal.

Inherited IRA's "Stretch" Limited to 10 Years

Currently, with a few exceptions, those who inherit an IRA can elect to take required minimum distributions over their lifetimes, which could stretch out for decades. Under the bill, heirs would no longer be able to liquidate the balance over their lifetime and stretch out tax payments. Instead, if you inherit a tax-advantaged retirement account after Dec. 31, 2019, you must withdraw the money within a decade of the IRA owner’s death and pay any taxes due.

Exceptions are provided for surviving spouses and minor children (under 18), folks who are less than 10 years younger than the account owner, and the chronically disabled. Planning distributions during this 10 year period will be crucial to heirs to avoid the highest tax rates from large distributions.

Utilize 529 Education Savings Plan Money To Pay off Student Loans

You’d be able to withdraw as much as $10,000 from a 529 education-savings plan for repayments of some student loans (including siblings), registered apprenticeships and homeschooling costs.

Group 401(k) Plans

An estimated 42% of private-sector workers don’t have access to a workplace retirement-savings plan. Under the bill, employers without retirement plans would have the option to band together to offer a 401(k)-type plan if they choose.

If you would like to review your current investment portfolio or discuss any other financial planning matters, please don’t hesitate to contact us or visit our website at http://www.ydfs.com. We are a fee-only fiduciary financial planning firm that always puts your interests first.  If you are not a client yet, an initial consultation is complimentary and there is never any pressure or hidden sales pitch. We start with a specific assessment of your personal situation. There is no rush and no cookie-cutter approach. Each client is different, and so is your financial plan and investment objectives.

Source: Wall Street Journal

 

 

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